A Guide for Expat Teachers in the Philippines

In all honesty, Philippines is an amazing country. It’s amazing regarding education, travel destinations, infrastructure, and a lot more. As a result, foreigners from several countries are coming to visit the country. Filipinos are friendly to foreigners and welcome them as part of the family.

In this article, I would like to address foreign teachers who are willing to take their talents to schools in the Philippines. I am discussing this topic because many expat teachers are experiencing issues in adjusting to the new culture. Sometimes, Filipino students are not as respectful to foreign teachers, and they even make fun of the teachers because they don’t know about some simple things that the students do.

I understand how it feels, but if you’re not going to do something to win over your Filipino students, your problems will remain the same for a long time.  

Without further ado, I’m going to share a guide for foreign teachers to deal with their Filipino students.

1 – Learn the universal culture in Philippine schools

It is essential for teachers to learn the behaviour of Filipino students. Before you apply as a teacher, it is important to do your homework first. Doing your homework before applying can give you the edge to know how you can blend in with the culture. One of the best ways to learn the culture quickly is to ask teachers who have lived in the Philippines. If you can’t catch up with their culture, you might have a problem adjusting and gelling with them in the long run.

2 – Build a solid relationship with the Filipino students

Building a stable relationship with the students is crucial. For foreign teachers, it is going to be tough for you to deal with Filipino students without building a relationship. Most of the teachers focus on their lesson plans and disciplining students rather than getting to know each other.

On the first day of class, you get to introduce yourself. However, as time flies by, teachers just forget how essential it is to build long lasting relationships towards their students. For you to build a relationship with students, connecting to them personally is essential. Demonstrate that you care for them gently and directly. Once you do this on a consistent basis, there is no doubt that the students will like you more.

3 – Motivation is the key

Everyone needs motivation, especially in school. You cannot just follow your lesson plan all day long. As a foreign teacher in a Philippine school, do things to make the students interested in learning more by giving them some motivation. In my experience as a student, I don’t think certain teachers learn how to motivate their students. They only stick to their lesson plans.

4 – Criticizing Filipino students won’t improve their academic performance and behaviour

I have seen firsthand when teachers get fed up in class and let their emotions get the best of them. One of my teachers used to regularly slam the table, and she had a reputation for being strict and feared. The way she treated the students didn’t improve the attitude of anyone in the room.crg

I have experienced a lot when it comes to criticism in school. During my school days, I was criticized by many teachers. They yelled first instead of giving encouragement and positivity. Getting angry and criticizing students is not the solution to make them behave and change their attitude. You need to remain calm. You could raise your voice a bit if they’re noisy, but not in the sense of getting furious. What’s essential is that you maintain a friendly relationship with the students by encouraging them even if they don’t perform well.

Conclusion

Foreign teachers like you should learn about adjusting to the school system in the Philippines. Now that you have learned how to deal with Filipino students in any school, it is time for you to apply and see how it goes.

About the author

When it comes to motivation and inspiring teachers and students, Jeff Caceres has been passionate about it for a long time. He conducts motivational and inspirational talks in schools, offices, groups, and other organizations to nurture and make students grow personally. Feel free to check out the website at The Paper Writing.