Top 5 Motorcycle Routes in Wales

Surrounded by majestic mountain ranges, glorious green valleys, and glistening rivers, the Welsh countryside offers motorcyclists a naturally stunning vista. From cruising along the rugged coastline, replete with blue lagoons and beautiful beaches, to riding through magnificent national parks, this list reveals the top five routes for motorbike riding in Wales.

  • Snowdonia

Snowdonia, a stunning national park to the north of Wales, offers smooth, wide, and winding roads. The A487, which cuts through the center of the park, is a wonderful route to take if you’re craving a long and peaceful trip. Other than being surrounded by breathtakingly beautiful scenery, you’ll have the opportunity to explore the many hidden beauties that Snowdonia has to offer.

Why not visit one of the many historic sites and castles, including Conwy castle which dates back to the thirteenth century, or explore the remains of an archaic roman fort called Tomen y Mur which lies at the heart of the park, just off the A470? Or if you’re feeling adventurous and fancy a challenge, conquer Mount Snowdon.

If you’re not much of a hiker, you could always catch the train that takes you above and beyond the clouds, to the summit. You’ll still get the chance to witness awe-inspiring panoramic views, except you won’t be worn out – so you can hop back on your bike, ready for the next stage of your adventure.

  • Brecon Beacons National Park

From smooth, sleek roads to tight, twisty bends, the Brecon Beacons (in southern Wales) offer diverse riding routes as well as beautiful views. You could take the A40, which stretches along the north part of the Beacons, giving you the chance to take in stunning views of the never-ending hills and lakes. You could also take the A470, which cuts through the center of the Beacons and lies between two towering mountain ranges, Pen y Fan and Fan Fawr.

After joining the A40 from the A470, you’ll find the quaint picturesque town of Brecon, where you can relax in a cosy café or dine in one of the charming local restaurants. Once you’re refreshed and ready for some action, why not pursue some off-road riding? To do this, you’ll need to contact the Local Rights of Way Officer for information on where to ride, or you could join one of the organizations representing riders such as Land Access and Recreation Association, Trail Riders Federation, Green Lane Association, or the Countryside Recreational Access Group.

With these organizations, you’ll get the opportunity to ride through forests, gravel and dirt trails, and water traps. Make sure you use a bike that will easily handle the terrain. If you own multiple (and properly insured) bikes, and an off-road dirt bike happens to be in your collection, this will handle rocky climbs and steep descents better than a scooter or a moped.  

  • Aberystwyth

The A487 stretches along the Welsh coast, making for a perfect long-haul ride and connects historic coastal towns including Aberystwyth. This picturesque seaside market town sits almost center along the Irish-facing coastline, making it a wonderful place for a quick stop. A trip to the seaside means treating yourself to delicious ice cream too!

Then make your way to The Cliff Railway, which offers unhindered views of the ocean and surrounding landscape. Once you reach the top of Constitution Hill, you’ll find the camera obscura, which is one of the largest in the world, and gives you a bird’s eye view of 1000 square miles of land and ocean.

  • Shropshire Hills

Spanning the border with England, the Shropshire Hills are titled as an area of outstanding natural beauty and make for spectacular daytime cruising. The A49, which can be found by riding along the A458 and onto the A5, runs southward and connects quaint villages, market towns, historic castles, and takes you through the heart of the picturesque Hills. This smooth, winding road is perfect for those looking for a tranquil ride. With rolling farmland, ancient forests, and veiled river valleys, the Hills offer a secluded escape from bustling city roads.

Keep riding south along the A49 from Shrewsbury and you’ll come across another medieval town called Ludlow, packed with yet more history and cobbled streets. Be sure to visit the historic Rose and Crown, which is a traditional English inn dating back to 1102, where you can enjoy a delicious hot roast dinner. From there, it’s back onto the A49 and the A44 into Wales and westwards to see the spectacular six dams of the Elan Valley.

  • Anglesey

Anglesey, an island slightly northwest of Wales, offers long winding roads and tight bends that are sure to please any motorbike adventurer. Due to its size, you could easily circle the entire island, starting from the A55 and then joining on the A5025, in around 80 minutes depending on speed and traffic. Surrounded by 125 miles of stunning coastline, why not park up, take off your helmet, and enjoy the island’s pretty pebbled beaches?

Whether you choose to cruise along sleek, smooth roads that wind between green rolling hills, or ride along dirt trails through majestic mountain ranges, Wales offers plenty of wonderfully diverse routes.

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